Jan
28

Corons

I’ll take this opportunity to discuss an important ‘theme’ that will be apparent in my honors thesis, which is the development of the corons in France. The term may appear by itself odd. It doesn’t seem to mean, even in French, what it actually means: a French coal mining village. Ville de charbon comes more to mine. This is because corons were special. The were social habits owned, operated, and constructed by the mining company for their workers. Corons derive from the latin cornus, which came down through French as coin, meaning corner. This is because corons were constructed along strict lines of 5 to 80 identical houses. The lines were separated by narrow streets and common amenities like the company store, schools, hospitals, etc, were often placed at the entrance. It was geometrically precise and rigid, hence the corners. There’s a whole philosophy behind this which I won’t get into at this time. You may also notice the term has some similarity with the Latin corona, which basically means crown, although in the Roman period the crown was often actually garland, not the King Arthur version. At the time of the corons’ inception in the 1810s, it was heralded as a model of health and comfort for workers who were known for being nomadisme during the early nineteenth century. The architecture of these towns was actually celebrated at the 1889 Exposition Universelle in Paris! But as I will point out in later blog posts, behind all their positive benefits came some nastier side effects.

Corons

(http://fred17.eklablog.com/les-corons-a108164302)