May
03

Summary of November

Hi guys,

It’s been some time, but I’ve been swamped with thesis things and so I thought now might be nice to give a few quick updates of what I’ve been up to. First I’ll start off with the month of November.

November is also the last month that I was in the lab running experiments. The last few experiments I conducted were pseudo-polyembryony experiments. These experiments were created as follow-up experiments to the findings I got from the transfer experiments I conducted in Friday Harbor. My last update talked about how I conducted these transfer experiments on the sand dollar species that I was working with in Washington, these experiments were done with pencil urchins. Pencil urchins were also found to exhibit similar polyembryony responses after exposure to similar abiotic stressors. So it’s pretty cool to see the same responses in completely different species that are still related phylogenetically.

Anywho, so after I followed the isolated pseudo-twins I followed them for about 24-48 hours and found that most of the embryos formed normal pleutei! This is really exciting because these findings suggest that these guys are able to reorganize their cellular structure and consequently form normal looking larvae. These experiments would be great to follow up on more closely! And it just shows don’t ignore the funky looking ‘bros. They might just surprise you!

 

P.S. Here are some pictures of pencil urchins in the lab.

 

This is an adult pencil urchin

This is an adult pencil urchin

 

This is what my experimental set up looks like after I've injected several urchins and waiting for a viable male and female to release their gametes.

This is what my experimental set up looks like after I’ve injected several urchins and waiting for a viable male and female to release their gametes.

 

These were the reproductive male and female urchins that I ended up using for this experimental trial. Are they not just the cutest couple???

These were the reproductive male and female urchins that I ended up using for this experimental trial. Are they not just the cutest couple???

 

These are a few pencil urchins in their tank. These guys live in the warm coastal waters of Florida. So when we get them shipped to us we keep them in warm water (19-23C) tanks.

These are a few pencil urchins in their tank. These guys live in the warm coastal waters of Florida. So when we get them shipped to us we keep them in warm water (19-23C) tanks.

IMG_5781

This is a labelled well plate that has all of the isolated pseudo-twins that I come back to check after a few days to see how they’ve progressed through development.