Apr
27

Civil Patrols, “Subversion” and Clandestine Cemeteries

The departure of the military and the dismantling of the military base near Santiago Atitlán led to a new discovery: a clandestine cemetery was discovered where the military base had been located. This discovery shows the inseparable link between the material remnants of violence and the power of militarization to condition the memories of said…
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Apr
27

Civil Patrols and Post-War Issues

With the end of the Guatemalan Civil War in 1996, the government and military of Guatemala formally began dismantling all civil patrols in August of that year. However, the social and political patterns which civil patrols and militarization had created and maintained did not completely go away. Likewise, the military, the state, and former patrollers…
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Apr
27

CERJ and Ethnic Resistance

CERJ’s commitment to combating ethnocide, genocide and promoting Maya cultural and ethnic rights through constitutional means led to their recognition by international human rights organizations. For instance, Americas Watch focused a 1989 report on CERJ. The Americas Watch report from 1989 claims that “CERJ takes seriously the notion that constitutional guarantees apply to Indians, even…
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Apr
27

CERJ’s protest and links to other Forms of Activism

CERJ also organized to place a Maya presence and Maya voices in the direct view of the national government and urban Ladinos, as CUC had done beginning in the late 1970s. In an article in the Central American Reporter from November 1988, John Lindsay-Poland reported on CERJ’s march in Guatemala City on August 17, 1988,…
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Apr
27

CERJ’s struggle

The maintenance of civil patrols was the result of many factors that interacted on local, departmental, national and international levels. On one hand, this thesis has analyzed how military planners, patrollers, and community members perceived the patrol system and its social and political consequences. This chapter instead explores the perspective of a civil society group…
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